A-Z of Gluten

This page is currently under construction, so please bear with us. It should be complete in the coming weeks. Thank you.

Whether you call it coeliac or celiac, have an intolerance or are just curious. We answer the most common questions.

Did you know that having an intolerance to gluten is very different to having coeliac disease? Or that gluten can be hidden in products such as soy sauce?

Have you ever wondered whether it is safe for someone with coeliac disease to drink coffee, dabble with spirits or even lick postage stamps? You aren’t alone.

There are a lot of misconceptions about gluten and coeliac disease out there and our aim is to set the record straight, backed up with facts you can trust.

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z
Disclosure: Recommendations and guidance can change at a moments notice and may not be reflected in this article. Don’t change your diet or self diagnose without first consulting a medical professional, always check product labels and ask your server if in doubt.

Source(s): NHS, Coeliac UK, NICE

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A

Allergy to gluten

Autoimmune condition

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B

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C

Calcium

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Causes of coeliac disease

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What is Coeliac disease?

Coeliac Disease is an autoimmune condition associated with chronic inflammation of the small intestine.

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Is coffee safe to drink?

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Complications of coeliac disease

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Cure for coeliac disease

Unfortunately, there is no cure for coeliac disease. I’m afraid you’ll have to follow a strict gluten-free diet as your only treatment option. That is unless researchers manage develop a vaccine.

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Treating Coeliac Disease

The only effective treatment is a strict, life-long, gluten-free diet. May find that some gluten-free products are available on prescription.

I’m afraid you’ll have to follow a strict gluten-free diet as your only treatment option. That is unless researchers manage develop a vaccine.

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D

Diagnosing coeliac disease

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E

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F

Foods containing gluten (unsafe to eat)

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G

Gluten-free diet

Gluten-free foods (safe to eat)

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H

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I

Intolerance to gluten

irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)

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J

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K

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L

Lactose intolerance

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M

Malabsorption of key nutrients

Having Coeliac Diseases means you have a higher risk of malabsorption of key nutrients, mainly Vitamin D and calcium. Your doctor may advise that you take supplements if you dietary intake is insufficient.

You should not self-medicate and consult your local GP before taking any over the counter supplements.

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Malnutrition

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N

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O

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P

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Q

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R

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S

Symptoms of coeliac disease

Do spirits contain gluten?

Are stamps safe to lick?

In the UK at least, it is perfectly safe for someone with coeliac disease to lick stamps and envelopes, as the Post Office and envelope manufacturers do not use any gluten in their gum. Lick away my friend.

With that said, always read the label and check with manufacturers if you are concerned.

Is there gluten in Soy Sauce?

Tamari is a great Gluten-Free Soy Sauce alternative. A popular brand is Kikkoman, which can be found in most supermarkets.

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T

Does toothpaste? contain gluten?

The British Dental Association is currently unaware of any toothpastes that contain gluten. In order for gluten to be problematic to someone with coeliac disease, it needs to be eaten. Unless you were purposefully eating a whole tube of toothpaste, you would be hard pressed to consume enough to trigger a reaction.

With that said, always read the label and check with manufacturers or your countries dental association if you are concerned.

Treating coeliac disease

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U

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V

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W

Who’s affected

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X

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Y

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Z

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